Opportunity: Dancers Wanted

emerging dancers wanted

We Are Epic Inclusive Arts are looking for two aspiring dancers to join their professional development dance company for their ID training sessions…

We’re looking to audition both disabled or non-disabled dancers who are looking to develop their skills in inclusive dance to working at a professional level. Dancers must have dance experience, be willing to progress further in contemporary dance, and be able to work within a company environment who support one another within the work.

Dancers are expected to attend weekly class on Monday evenings in Leicester from 5-6:45pm and to attend weekend intensives with a professional choreographer at various dates within the year. So far our choreographers have included James Cousins, Tim Casson and Rosie Kay. Dancers may also be expected to perform at various events as part of the company.

If you’d like to be considered for audition please email Charlotte@epicarts.org.uk
with a short ‘Expression of Interest’ (maximum 300 words) stating why you would like to join We Are Epic and what experience you have.

Please let us know if you have any disabilities, learning difficulties or access needs. It would also be preferable if you can send a video clip of yourself dancing. If you prefer you can send your Expression of Interest by speaking on your video clip.

Selected dancers will be invited to join in with one of our company classes as the next stage of the selection process.

Minimum age 19.

Deadline for Expression of Interest is Friday 8th Nov 2019

Space Between the Boxes: Identity & Belonging: D/disabled or D/deaf and LGBTQ+

Intersectional Inclusive Arts - Identity & Belonging LGBTQ+ & D/disabled

In my last blog post I mentioned that I’ve been given opportunity to lead on my own creative project whilst here at We Are Epic, so I will give you a bit of a more detailed overview of this and an update on where it currently is!

The Spark

When Ant spoke to me about running my own project one of the first things that came to mind was an article I had read the day before, written by a young man who identified as disabled and bisexual. In this article he discussed dating/relationships and the discrimination he has faced because of his disability and sexual orientation.

He discussed the kind of everyday discrimination he faced, and how being a part of two diverse groups meant that he was forced to identify as one or the other on many occasions, rather than being seen as a complete person.

‘The Space Between The Boxes’

This led to discussions around identifying in more than one diverse group, and the ‘space between the boxes’ that people want to tick when discussing identity, and questions such as what happens when you don’t fit into one ‘box’?

Why is this such a problem? Why can’t we see the whole person, why is there such a need to allocate people into boxes?

I realized that issues around identifying as D/disabled and LGBTQ+ had been something I had heard a lot about in the media, in discussion with people I know, and whilst working as a support worker at Outburst, an LGBTQ+ youth service in Nottingham. However, when researching this didn’t seem to be something that was being discussed at a level to affect change, and I wondered what was being done to tackle this sort of discrimination.

The Project Begins To Take Shape

Ant and Lou thought this was an interesting subject to focus on, and we had in depth discussions around what this might look like, they also gave me a lot of guidance on engaging participants in initial discussions and the best way to move forward with the project.

Having established artists to mentor the participants throughout the project is something that I also want to organize.

At the minute the focus of the project is meeting and having conversations around identity, belonging and the lived experiences of people that identify as D/disabled and LGBTQ+.

These conversations will inform where the project goes and the kind of output that will be produced, this will also be directly influenced by the creative practices of the participants.

The call out for people to engage in these initial conversations has now gone out and I am excited to start meeting and chatting about the project!

If this has answered a few more questions you had and you are interested then please get in touch, take a look at the callout below.

 

Meet Michael, our new Arts Admin Trainee

Hi there!

I’m Michael and I am the Arts Administration Trainee here at We Are Epic. I am writing this blog towards the end of my first month here at We Are Epic, and I am currently staring at a page full of excitedly scribbled down notes about my experiences here so far. So bear with me as I try to get everything down.

My background in the arts is as a performer/practitioner, so this role is providing me with an insight into a different side of the arts. I have previously worked with young people with SEND in school settings, and continue to work with young people at a youth organisation in Nottingham, with a big focus on the LGBTQ+ service.

My first couple of days

My first couple of days were a whirlwind of coffee, lots of discussions and a plethora of new faces. As soon as you arrive at the Attenborough Arts Centre there is a buzz about the building, and a sense of excitement as artists and participants flit in and out of spaces. Ant and Lou were very clear and concise when discussing my role and the kind of guidance and mentoring I would receive, but they were also very clear that they wanted me to have responsibility for setting up specific systems and allowing me a sense of ownership with the administration in the office.

During my first couple of days we spent a lot of time discussing artists and companies that work in partnership with We Are Epic, and the ways in which We Are Epic are helping to support them, such as the Pinpoint Powwow’s.

Slowly but surely I was building a bigger picture of what We Are Epic encompass and the work they are doing.

In my second week

I attended the Devoted and Disgruntled event for We Are Epic,

which was a brilliant opportunity to network, get a snapshot of the needs of artists and contribute to important discussions around inclusion, diversity and the future of performing arts.

My own creative project

Ant and Lou also discussed the importance of me having my own creative project to work on, supported by We Are Epic, which is an amazing opportunity, more details to follow in the next blog!

Right, that is probably enough for now! I will be writing and posting updates regularly, so keep a look out!

Come along to a PinPoint Powwow in LEI

Our event in January was a small success and now you’re invited to join us for our next one.  People who came had opportunities to network and ended up with support for hot desking, a meeting to swap skills and ways of working with children with challenging behaviours and there were in-depth dicussions around what it is to be a freelance artist while teaching and building a business. People went away feeling more connected and with little tangible things they could do to develop their practices. 
From our side, we collected feedback on our mission statement and listen to how we can be clearer with how we present ourselves. We started conversations and listened to opinions of how We Are Epic could support the local artistic scene, begin to fill the gaps and things to consider for future ventures. After all we’re more interested in supporting what’s already going on and collaborating, than reinventing the wheel!
If you’re new to We Are Epic, the event is a few hours designed for local Leicester based performing arts artists, practitioners & facilitators to network, exchange ideas & experiences, & for us to find ways to support the local landscape. 
Our background is in arts, in the UK and in Cambodia. We’ve worked across the mainstream and disabled-led performing art sectors with disabled and non-disabled artists, practitioners and facilitators. We understand the importance of access and inclusion at many levels. If you want to come and would like to chat about access requirements contact Lou Coleman, Diversity Officer.
 
The event will be at The Attenborough Arts Centre, 10-15 minutes from Leicester train station. 
 
See our invite for more details.
 
Bring friends, colleagues and collaborators and feel free to pass this opportunity around your networks, remembering if you’re coming to RSVP.
 
See you on Monday 5 March 2018!
Lou Coleman, Diversity Officer.

The First PinPoint Powwow!

We Are Epic is up and moving! You’re invited to join us for an evening to find out who we are, what we’re doing and where we’ve come from! There’ll be food and drink, a relaxed, friendly atmosphere and a chance to dig a around, ask us questions and find out some of our plans for the coming months!
We are Ant Evans and Lou Coleman. Our background is in arts, in the UK (Lou) and in Cambodia (Ant). We’ve worked across the mainstream and disabled-led performing art sectors with disabled and non-disabled artists, practitioners and facilitators. We understand the importance of access and inclusion at many levels. If you want to come and would like to chat about access requirements contact Lou Coleman, Diversity Officer.
The event will be at The Attenborough Arts Centre, 10-15 minutes from Leicester train station.
Booking is essential, see our invite for more details.
Bring friends, colleagues and collaborators – see you on Monday 2 October!
Lou Coleman, Diversity Officer.